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Schedule Updates

November 2022

Irrigation Shut Downs
We are currently shutting down irrigation systems. Please give the office a call at 913-829-6135 to get on the schedule.

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Turf Maintenance
Round 7

Winterizer Granular Fertilizer
Providing a heavy nitrogen feeding designed to help the lawn carry through the Winter and help with greening up in the Spring.

If you are interested in starting your personalized turf health plan please give us a call.

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Plant Health Care
We are currently on our 6th and final round of our Plant Health Care Program. In this round we will be treating Yews, Arborvitae, Junipers, Boxwood, Spruce, and Euonymus with a bactericide and fungicide to help prevent Winter desiccation. This application is done during November/December.

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Mowing Service
The 2022 mowing season has ended. If you’re interested in mowing services for 2023 please contact the office at (913) 829-6135 to discuss your needs and pricing.

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Tar spot on mapels

Recently we have seen alot of below disease on maples here is good article from purdue on what it is and how to treat

Tar Spot on Maple

 

The following question was sent to the P&PDL diagnosticians here at Purdue University:

Question: Almost every summer the leaves on my maple trees have black spots on them that look like tar. What is it and what should I do about it?

Answer: Tar spot on maple is not actually "tar" on maple, but rather a fungal disease. Tar spots on maples are caused by fungi in the genus Rhytisma. The most common species are Rhytisma acerinum and R. punctatum.

Symptoms first appear in late spring or early summer as infected leaves develop light green or yellow-green spots. During mid to late summer, black tar-like raised structures are formed on the upper surface of leaves within the yellow spots. R. acerinum causes spots that are 0.5 to 2 cm in diameter; R. punctatum causes spots that are smaller (about 1mm in diameter). Spots caused by R. punctatum are sometimes called speckled tar spots.

Tar spot diseases seldom are detrimental to the overall health of infected trees. Tar spots may cause premature defoliation, but are not known to kill trees. Tar spot diseases are best managed by raking and destroying fallen leaves because the fungi overwinter on leaves.

–Peggy Sellers

 

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