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Schedule Updates

November 2022

Irrigation Shut Downs
We are currently shutting down irrigation systems. Please give the office a call at 913-829-6135 to get on the schedule.

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Turf Maintenance
Round 7

Winterizer Granular Fertilizer
Providing a heavy nitrogen feeding designed to help the lawn carry through the Winter and help with greening up in the Spring.

If you are interested in starting your personalized turf health plan please give us a call.

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Plant Health Care
We are currently on our 6th and final round of our Plant Health Care Program. In this round we will be treating Yews, Arborvitae, Junipers, Boxwood, Spruce, and Euonymus with a bactericide and fungicide to help prevent Winter desiccation. This application is done during November/December.

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Mowing Service
The 2022 mowing season has ended. If you’re interested in mowing services for 2023 please contact the office at (913) 829-6135 to discuss your needs and pricing.

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Truth about growing grass in shade!

This is probably the most commonly asked question by our customers…so to shed some light on the situation, I’ve enclosed a great article from K-State research & extension-

"Turfgrasses differ in their capacity to grow in shade. Among Kansas turfgrasses, tall fescue is the best adapted to shade. Although the fine fescues (i.e., creeping red, chewings, hard and sheep) have better shade tolerance, they lack heat tolerance and typically decline during hot Kansas summers. The warm-season grasses have the poorest shade tolerance, although zoysia does better than bermuda and buffalo.

Where shade is still too heavy for fescue, there are other courses of action. The most obvious is to either remove trees, or to prune limbs and thin the tree canopies. Grass will do better under openly spaced trees than under closely spaced trees. Pruned limbs and thinned canopies will allow more sunlight to directly reach the turfgrass.

If possible, raise the mowing height in the shade to compensate for the more upright growth of the leaves, and to provide more leaf area for photosynthesis. The thin, weak turf in the shade may tempt you to fertilize more. Don’t do it! The nitrogen rate for shaded grass should be cut back to at least half of that for grass in full sun. Too much nitrogen in the spring causes the plant to grow faster and may result in starvation. Late fall fertilization after tree leaves have fallen, on the other hand, is important for shaded cool-season turfgrasses. Irrigate infrequently but deeply. Light, frequent irrigation may encourage tree feeder-roots to stay near the surface, which increases competition between the trees and the turf. Restrict traffic in the shade.

Many times, the best choice for shaded areas is switch from a turfgrass to a more shade-tolerant plant. For example, English ivy and periwinkle (Vinca minor) are much more shade tolerant than any turfgrass adapted to our area."

-K-State research & extension

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